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Learning Sessions

A STREAM

A1: Addressing the Service Gap: Free mental health services for people experiencing depression and anxiety

The Government of Ontario is investing in two proven psychotherapy services, which will help over 100,000 people receive treatment for depression and anxiety. These services are available now, and free for people living in Ontario: Big White Wall, an online peer support and self-management tool, coordinated by the Ontario Telemedicine Network; and BounceBack, a telephone coaching program, managed by the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) Ontario and CMHA York and South Simcoe. Attend this session to learn about the telephone coaching and online support tools, benefits seen in the pilot stages, and how to put these services into practice at your organization.

Presenters: Anna Piszczkiewicz, Stakeholder Engagement Coordinator, Canadian Mental Health Association, Ontario Division; Harriet Ekperigin, Senior Business Lead, Ontario Telemedicine Network; Andrew Fairbairn, Stakeholder Engagement Coordinator, Canadian Mental Health Association, Ontario Division

Theme: Mental health and harm reduction

Audience: Front line/clinical and/or program staff|Senior management|Program management

A2: Health in Housing Initiative: Increasing Access, Integration and Impact

This session will provide an overview of the Health in Housing Initiative, designed to engage isolated residents in their low-income housing complexes with the goal of achieving better health and wellness outcomes. During the session, we will share how an interdisciplinary team at London InterCommunity Health Centre collaboratively delivers mobile supports and services for this segment of the population, using data to drive improved outcomes. We will also touch on the robust evaluation framework used in the pilot stage, in-depth results, challenges and learnings, and how the initiative was grounded in the Model of Health and Wellbeing.

Presenters: Tosha Densky, Community Development Worker, London InterCommunity Health Centre; Shelly Happy, Community Development Worker; London InterCommunity Health Centre

Theme: Demonstrating value and impact

Audience: Front line/clinical and/or program staff|Program management

A3: Breathing Easier: Using the Health Equity Impact Assessment to ensure equitable delivery of a primary care respiratory program

A Health Equity Impact Assessment conducted by 10 primary care asthma program (PCAP) coordinators was compiled and followed up on by focus groups facilitated by the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care and the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. Where barriers to respiratory care were identified, such as low literacy and language barriers, partners such as The Lung Association (Ontario) provided innovative solutions – such as a pictorial triggers booklet for asthma patients, and an asthma infographic. Another common barrier addressed was geographic accessibility of PCAP programs. PCAP leaders will present lessons from the process of identifying gaps and addressing patients’ needs.

Presenters: Sara Han, PCAP Provincial Coordinator, The Lung Association Ontario; Christina Dolgowicz, Lung Health Coordinator, Lanark Renfrew Lung Health Program, North Lanark CHC

Theme: Transforming our health system

Audience: All audiences

A4: Cultural Humility: A Better Path for Enabling Health Equity

Participants will learn the difference between cultural competency and cultural humility, the principles of the latter, and what it looks like in practice. Cultural humlity provides a container within which the research-planning-implementation-evaluation techniques of Health Equity Impact Assessment, for example, can be undertaken with greater self- and other-consciousness and emotional intelligence. Using experiential and play-based techniques, this session will get people out of their chairs and into interactive encounters designed to give a sense of what it means to put cultural humility intro practice in a health care setting. We’ll be surfacing difficult topics, but we’ll have fun, too!

Presenters: LeeAnn McKenna, Principal, LeeAnn McKenna Associates SP

Theme: Health equity and anti-oppression

Audience: All audiences

A5: Caring for My COPD: Successes, challenges and lessons learned from a community-based pulmonary rehab program

The HNHB Caring for My COPD program is a 10-week community-based program for patients recently hospitalized with an acute exacerbation of their COPD or at risk of an acute exacerbation. Patients are supported by a multidisciplinary team, and the program is currently offered in four Community Health Centres, in Hamilton, Brantford, Welland and Niagara Falls. The session will provide an overview of the development and implementation of the program, highlighting innovations in a community-based approach. Personal stories from program staff, clients and their partners in care will shed light on the value and impact of designing and participating in an innovative patient-centered program.

Presenters: Elsa Deyell, Program Coordinator and Certified Respiratory Educator, Centre de santé communautaire Hamilton/Niagara; Keira Rainville, Community Health Counsellor and Certified Tobacco Educator, Centre de santé communautaire Hamilton/Niagara

Theme: High performing interprofessional teams

Audience: Front line/clinical and/or program staff|Senior management|Program management

A6: Rural Change: Creating the conditions for community-centred collaboration

This session will suggest the importance of allowing people and communities to identify service needs and requirements. At the core is a partnership between a Community Health Centre and a community foundation to create a collaborative environment among service providers. The Vital Signs initiative, developed and supported by Community Foundations Canada, was our model. We will describe the steps taken toward partnering with: the local health unit, community social service agencies, health experts, local politicians, as well as community members. We will also talk about how the results will be applied to improve community health outcomes.

Presenters: Kara Symbolic, Community Programs and Communications Director, Lanark Renfrew Health & Community Services; Lynn McIntyre, Executive Director, Perth and District Community Foundation

Theme: People and communities at the centre

Audience: Front line/clinical and/or program staff|Program management

A7: Quality Improvement in the Neighbourhood: A project to highlight population-health data and health-system concerns collected from clients

A diverse team will outline steps taken in a quality improvement (QI) project that took place between February and December 2017 to make strategic use of population-level client health data. Following discussion with the leadership team at South Riverdale Community Health Centre (SRCHC), a decision was taken to assign 0.10FTE time of a data administrator to the organization’s LHIN-wide self-management program. Based on remote locations of teams, a workflow was identified, tested, and by December 2017 has been established. As a result of this QI project, by June 2018, we will publish reports to highlight clients’ stories and concerns for advocacy and education purposes.

Presenters: Parth Shah, Data Administrator; Rubina Kharel, Program Assistant; Jolene Funk, Program Assistant; Surkhab Peerzada, Manager, Choose Health program; Kathleen Foley, Manager of Quality Improvement; Jason Altenberg, Director of Programs and Services, South Riverdale Community Health Centre

Theme: High performing interprofessional teams

Audience: All audiences

A8: May the Force be with Youth

Picture a youth-led mental health initiative in a small rural community featured on the 6 o’clock news. A group of 10 youth from the West Elgin Community Health Centre (WECHC) Youth Advisory Committee worked for a year and a half preparing this awareness day for 250 students, after a need had been identified using the Canadian Index of Wellbeing (CIW) survey. This learning session will explore the development of the WECHC Youth Advisory committee, and how WECHC addresses the needs of youth in a rural context, and explain initiatives they are currently working on.

Presenters: Kristyn Munroe, Child and Youth Worker, West Elgin CHC; WECHC Youth Advisory Committee

Theme: People and communities at the centre

Audience: All audiences

A9: Racial Battle Fatigue: Explorations and Challenges

As providers we are concerned for the health and wellbeing of those who trust us to care for them. Some of our clients have been subjected to racial and social trauma that requires a special kind of space in which they can begin to heal and work through. We know that the impact of racism, discrimination, and social oppression is traumatic and affects clients mentally, emotionally, physically, and spiritually – consider racial battle fatigue (RBF). How do we ensure that our “care” and “help” do not add to the trauma?  How can we practice from an anti-oppressive position?  This session examines the clinical space that is offered to clients who have experienced racial and social trauma; and offers some useful ways to build a privileged space for clients to work towards better health and wellbeing.

Presenters: Tapo Chimbganda, Clinical Counsellor, Bramalea Community Health Centre

Theme: Health equity and anti-oppression

Audience: All audiences

A10: Impacts and Opportunities of the Provincial Election to Advance an Integrated Health System

Community Health Ontario (CHO) is the voice of the LHIN-funded community sector, a strategic partnership between Addictions and Mental Health Ontario (AMHO), the Association of Ontario Health Centres (AOHC), the Canadian Mental Health Association - Ontario Division (CMHA ON) and the Ontario Community Support Association (OCSA). Together, CHO represents the majority of the non-profit home care, community support, mental health, addictions and community governed primary health care organizations in Ontario. CHO envisions healthy communities served by a vibrant network of community-governed, community-based, people-centred health services that are seamlessly coordinated with the full spectrum of care, including services that address the determinants of health. This panel presentation, designed for senior leaders and board members, will share insights from Community Health Ontario’s CEOs about the outcome of the Provincial election including potential impacts and opportunities for advancing an integrated health and community system, sub-LHIN planning, care coordination, and more. 

Presenters: Adrianna Tetley, CEO, Association of Ontario Health Centres; Gail Czukar, CEO, Addictions and Mental Health Ontario; Camille Quenneville , CEO Canadian Mental Health Association (Ontario)

Theme: Transforming our health system; Community-centred governance and equity

Audience: Senior management|Board members

 

A11: Using Data to Drive Practice Improvement

This hands-on presentation will provide attendees with information on the use of administrative data to drive practice improvement. The session will focus on the Community Health Centre version of the MyPractice: Primary Care report, with an emphasis on the new opioid prescribing information to be added in Spring 2018. It will also provide an overview of the suite of provincial supports for opioid prescribing and pain management that complement the MyPractice report and further support teams in planning for local practice improvement.

Presenters: Wissam Haj-Ali, Senior Methodologist, Health Quality Ontario; Maria Krahn, Specialist, Clinical Improvement And Informatics, Health Quality Ontario

Theme: Demonstrating value and impact

Audience: All audiences

A12: Rx Community I - Lessons in Collaborative Practice and Systems Change from Altogether Better

This session accompanies our Social Prescribing plenary and serves as part of the official launch for Rx: Community, our new Social Prescribing Pilot project. Come ask UK leaders how they do it! In this session we will have a Q&A on a whole systems approach to developing Collaborative Practice – a new relationship between citizens and services.

Presenters: Alyson McGregor, National Director, Altogether Better; Martin Fischer, Associate, Altogether Better

Theme: People and Communities at the Centre

Audience: All audiences

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B STREAM

B1: Productivity Tools for Community Health Workers: Efficient Practices, GTD, Pomodoro and Todoist

Community health workers are constantly faced with thoughts, emails and tasks while having to juggle a heavy and complex caseload. Managing time and retaining focus can be challenges. A lack of productivity tools can contribute to burnouts and overwork. This session will explore efficient practices and some tools to manage thoughts; to stay focused and control time; and to organize tasks and get in sync with all devices. This workshop is designed to be interactive and engage participants. Whether you have a tablet, cellphone or laptop, you will learn ways to boost your productivity in a technology-driven environment.

Presenters: Marcus Zacharia, Multicultural Health Navigator, Somerset West Community Health Centre; Mary Nduati, Administrative Assistant, Somerset West Community Health Centre

Theme: High performing interprofessional teams

Audience: Front line/clinical and/or program staff|Program management|Administration

B2: Health, Wellbeing, and Welcoming: Innovations uncovered while providing support to newcomer populations in Kingston

The Kingston Community Health Centres (KCHC) provides a wide variety of programming -- including federally funded settlement services – for the majority of new arrivals in the area, including close to 400 over the last two years. KCHC has piloted a range of initiatives to address the needs of this complex client population, in areas of primary health, allied health, parenting and early learning. This four-part session will reflect on KCHC’s innovations in support for newly arrived refugees in a smaller urban centre. We’ll also hear from other CHCs in the audience about best practices for collaboration and integration.

Presenters: Ruth Noordegraaf, Manager Immigrant Services; Meghan O'Leary, Manager Primary Health Care

Theme: Health equity and anti-oppression

Audience: All audiences

B3: SPOTLIGHT SESSIONS 

B3.1: Towards More Equitable Engagement: Cancer Care Ontario’s project to build an inclusive framework for patient, family and public engagement practices

Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) works with more than 100 patient and family advisors (PFAs) from across Ontario who have lived experience in the cancer system and provide a voice for patients. But there is growing evidence this approach brings a narrow set of patient voices to the table. To create a framework for more diverse engagement, CCO invested in a multi-stage project to identify populations whose voices were not being heard. CCO also engaged with community partners to develop a new framework for engagement (now in the pilot stage). This session will detail CCO’s approach to improving equity in engagement.

Presenters: Suman Dhanju, Manager, Patient Experience & Engagement, Cancer Care Ontario; Brett Nicholls, Person-Centred Care Lead, Cancer Care Ontario

Theme: Health equity and anti-oppression

Audience: Policy makers|Program management|Administration

B3.2: Mental Health Through an Equity Lens: An action framework for meeting the needs of marginalized populations

LGBTQ+ youth, women, older clients, Indigenous people, newcomers, and people living in poverty are some of the groups who regularly face difficulty accessing mental health and addictions resources. The issues they face are wide-ranging and complex, and system level changes that impact the social determinants of health are needed to reduce barriers. To ensure marginalized clients receive timely care according to their needs, organizations need to address equity in mental health care planning. CMHA Ontario has developed a tool called Advancing Equity in Ontario: An Action Framework, which will be introduced during the session.

Presenters: Uppala Chandrasekera, Director of Public Policy, CMHA Ontario; Vizarath Ali, CMHA Ontario

Theme: Health equity and anti-oppression

Audience: Senior management|Policy makers|Program management

B4: Understanding institutional and client-level determinants of appointment no-shows at a Community Health Centre

Appointment no-shows can adversely affect the health of clients and cause substantial strain on resources and reduced productivity for the centre. Based on a retrospective chart review study and focus group discussions with healthcare providers, this session will share findings about institutional and client-level factors associated with appointment no-shows among rostered primary care clients at Access Alliance. Following this, we will engage in a facilitated discussion on potential solutions to reduce appointment no-shows and missed opportunities for care for vulnerable clients at community health centres.

Presenters: Susitha Wanigaratne, Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, Centre for Urban Health Solutions (C-UHS), Institute for Clinical and Evaluative Sciences (ICES); Khnah Le, Manager, Primary Care Services, Access Alliance Multicultural Health and Community Services

Theme: High performing interprofessional teams

Audience: All audiences

B5: Integrated Supervised Consumption Services: Lessons learned from early adopters

A supervised injection/consumption service (SIS/SCS) is a health service where people inject or consume pre-obtained drugs in a safe and hygienic environment under the supervision of trained staff. South Riverdale CHC, Parkdale-Queen West CHC and Sandy Hill CHC have all recently expanded their harm reduction programs to include SIS/SCS. In this panel, we will share our experiences of developing and implementing SIS/SCS, including service and staffing models, challenges, successes and lessons learned so far. There will be a discussion and time for questions on: the Health Canada exemption process; involving people who use drugs in model design; community engagement; and acceptability and uptake of SIS/SCS.

Presenters: Natalie Kallio, Coordinator, keepSIX Supervised Consumption Services, South Riverdale Community Health Centre; Rob Boyd, Oasis Program Director, Sandy Hill Community Health Centre

Theme: Mental health and harm reduction

Audience: All audiences

B6: Managing Back Pain and Opioid Use through Inter-Professional Teams: Belleville NPLC Primary Care Low Back Pain Pilot

Three of the four leading causes of disability in North America are musculoskeletal (MSK) in nature, and low back pain ranks No. 1. Additionally, low back pain is reported in over half of opioid users. The Belleville Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinic (NPLC) Primary Care Low Back Pain Pilot is one of seven pilot sites that include MSK experts, such as chiropractors, working in interprofessional teams to manage clients’ pain. The Belleville NPLC Pilot Lead Chiropractor and Belleville Quinte West CHC Pharmacist will highlight the experiences of providers and clients as well as evaluation findings, which include high reductions in pain medication use, including opioids.

Presenters: Dr. Bruce Flynn, Chiropractic Lead, Belleville PCLBP Pilot, Belleville Nurse Practitioner-Led Clinic; Luba Shepertycky, RPh Primary Care Pharmacist, Belleville Quinte West Community Health Centre

Theme: Demonstrating value and impact

Audience: All audiences

B7: SPOTLIGHT SESSIONS 

B7.1: ‘Not My Kid’: Opioids, Addiction and Adolescents

This session will share best practices on one community’s effort to educate and inform parents, teachers, coaches, and caregivers on opioid use and addiction in adolescents. Participants will learn about the “Not My Kid” series of community forums held in Windsor-Essex, which were unique opportunities for a range of partners to come together to educate attendees on the array of supports and services available to address adolescent substance use. Participants will learn about elements that went into designing this turnkey program, spearheaded by Windsor Essex Community Health Centre, including: how to engage community resources, community sponsorship, media outreach, and how to involve people with lived experience.

Presenters: Jodi Pearce, Health Promoter, Windsor Essex Community Health Centre; Alexandra Wiseman, Health Promoter, Windsor Essex Community Health Centre

Theme: People and communities at the centre

Audience: Front line/clinical and/or program staff

B7.2: Walking the Path: Improving service pathways between primary care and community-based child and youth mental health services

Based on recommendations from a recently launched policy-ready paper, the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) Research Institute, and the Ontario Centre of Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health are jointly implementing an applied research pilot project in two Ontario communities. The project goal is to strengthen the interface between primary care and community-based child and youth mental health services. This session will share early lessons on: creating organizational structures and practices that support inter-provider communication; developing guidelines and standardized clinical pathways; and integrating standardized tools in primary care practices.

Presenters: Dr. Mario Cappelli, Director, Psychiatric and Mental Health Research, CHEO Research Institute; Laura Kelly, Program Associate, The Ontario Centre of Excellence for Child and Youth Mental Health

Theme: Mental health and harm reduction

Audience: Front line/clinical and/or program staff|Senior management|Policy makers

B8: CCA Accreditation and Quality Improvement 101

Accreditation is a learning opportunity that provides a holistic assessment on organizational performance. This session will provide an overview of the Canadian Centre for Accreditation’s services to its clients, which include: providing peer review of client organizations that is based on various sources of evidence and recognized performance standards, and engaging all stakeholders in a continuous quality improvement process. For those who have yet to undergo accreditation, recommendations will be provided to help assist organizations to achieve a state of readiness for accreditation.

Presenters: Sui Mee Cheng, Executive Director, Canadian Centre for Accreditation; Jackeline Barragan, Accreditation Manager, Canadian Centre for Accreditation

Theme: Demonstrating value and impact

Audience: All audiences

B9: Introduction to Inclusive Leadership in Governance

This session introduces an Inclusive Leadership in Governance framework for action through board membership and authentic engagement, and at the board table through effective strategies, policies, structures and practices. Topics covered in this session include: health equity, anti-racism, intersectionality, cultural humility, anti-oppression, inclusive leadership and meaningful community engagement. Participants will learn about examples of how boards are thinking and acting strategically to advance equity and inclusion.

Presenters: Anu Radha Verma, Inclusive Leadership in Governance Project Coordinator, Association of Ontario Health Centres; Heidi Schaeffer, Knowledge and Learning Lead, Association of Ontario Health Centres

Theme: Community-centred governance and equity

Audience: Board members

B10: SPOTLIGHT SESSIONS

B10.1: Interprofessional models of care incorporating midwifery with OB, traditional birthing practices, teachings and NP supports

Description coming soon

Theme: Truth and Reconciliation

B10.2: Experience implementing an interprofessional and integrated care model - client in-take that improves integrated and wholistic health and wellbeing

This session will share how Southwest Ontario Aboriginal Health Access Centre (SOAHAC) has implemented an integrated care model, focusing on Wholistic Integrated Care Circles (WICC) as a valuable tool for interprofessional care teams. Rooted in an Indigenous worldview of interconnectedness, these Circles improve wholistic care for clients and families by maximizing interprofessional collaboration and incorporating traditional Indigenous and western approaches. Participants will learn how these Circles create a safe space for direct, effective consultation and team-based problem solving to expertly address the health and wellness needs of clients and families

Presenters: Bonnie Smith, Integrated Care Manager for Southwest Ontario Aboriginal Health Access Centre - London; Lisa George, Integrated Care Manager for Southwest Ontario Aboriginal Health Access Centre - Owen Sound

Theme: Truth and Reconciliation

B11: Equip Your Organization for a CQIP: How to participate in sub-region collaborative quality improvement planning

Quality Improvement Plans are shifting to include a collaborative model, piloted in Waterloo-Wellington LHIN. As lead for a Health Link in Cambridge & North Dumfries and the Hub@1145, Langs led the CQIP with participation of 12 health and social service partners (senior leaders and board members) to address mental health and addiction services integration with primary care.  See tools and processes; learn on the ground strategies, including Board engagement strategies, and lessons learned from stakeholders in the CQIP, including Health Quality Ontario, WWLHIN and Langs.  Discuss opportunities and replicability of this sub-region quality improvement planning model in your sub-region, collaborative working groups or hubs.

Presenters: Kerry-Lynn Wilkie, Health Link Director, Cambridge and North Dumfries, Langs; Bill Davidson, Executive Director, Langs; Julie Nicholls, Quality Improvement Specialist, Health Quality Ontario; Kerri Bennett, Quality Improvement Specialist, Health Quality Ontario

Theme: Demonstrating value and impact

Audience: All audiences

B12: Creating Collaboration: Tools and methods for weaving community wisdom into your organization

There are a multitude of techniques to engage the people we serve. But with the launch of Accreditation Canada’s Patient Experience Office in 2018, the standards of co-design are inching towards clients being involved from start to finish in all quality improvement efforts. This session will share a methodology and key tools robust enough to meet evidence requirements for your surveyors, yet flexible enough to be highly adaptive to your organization and its diverse clients. Participants will also explore these tools and methods -- designed to unleash the wisdom of both staff and clients – in two in-session exercises.

Presenters: Callum Tyrrell, Quality Engagement Manager, Scarborough Centre for Healthy Communities

Theme: People and communities at the centre

Audience: Front line/clinical and/or program staff|Program management

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C STREAM

C1: SPOTLIGHT SESSIONS

C.1: Food Skills for Families Program Partnership Helps to Build Strong Communities

In 2017, Diabetes Canada (DC) and the Scarborough Centre for Healthy Communities (SCHC) partnered to offer the DC Food Skills for Families (FSF) program. The program is focused on increasing food literacy among Canadians and empowering them to make healthier food choices. With a focus on chronic disease prevention and management, its hands-on approach provides healthy eating and cooking skills to communities facing food insecurity. This successful partnership, which has seen the six-week program spread to eight agencies in Scarborough, will be discussed in a case-study format to share the roles, processes and success evidence the project uncovered.

Presenters: Jill MacDonald, Master Trainer, Food Skills for Families, Diabetes Canada

Theme: High performing interprofessional teams

Audience: All audiences

C1.2: Empowerment in the Kitchen: How to share food skills and promote wellbeing

This session highlights how cooking programs can be implemented to help promote food knowledge, skills, and access for clients who have a variety of mental health disorders. Experiences from a new drop-in cooking program will highlight how to engage clients in the planning and implementation of each class. Strategies and suggestions on how to alter program content (recipes, educational resources, teaching moments) for clients with persistent mental illness will be discussed. This talk will showcase how food literacy can be delivered across unique settings, and the effectiveness of a partnership between a CHC and local hospital in providing nutritional support.

Presenters: Adam Hudson, Community Registered Dietitian, Port Hope Northumberland Community Health Centre

Theme: People and communities at the centre

Audience: Front line/clinical and/or program staff|Program management

C2: Advancing Organization- and System-level Indigenous Cultural Safety: Health Quality Ontario’s commitment and progress to date

This session is focused on sharing Health Quality Ontario’s (HQO) experience and learnings as it moves toward organization-wide Indigenous Cultural Safety and promotion of system-level practices across health sectors. Since spring 2017, HQO has worked in close partnership with the Ontario Indigenous Cultural Safety (ICS) Training Program to formulate a learning plan for the organization as a first step toward becoming a culturally safe organization and promoting ICS as an important health quality issue. The learning plan consists of training for the organization’s board of directors and senior leadership team, followed by completion of the Core Health learning module by all HQO board and team members.

Presenters: Andrea Bracaglia, Senior Analyst, Health Equity, Health Quality Ontario; Diane Smylie, Director, Ontario Indigenous Cultural Safety Program

Theme: Truth and Reconciliation

Audience: Senior management|Program management|Administration

C3: Tapping the Potential of Primary Care Nurses: Are we utilizing RNs to their full scope of practice?

This session will demonstrate how the Scarborough Centre for Healthy Communities CHC implemented full scope of practice for Registered Nurses, including nurse-led programs, to continue to foster optimal and positive client experiences. This session will discuss how that implementation has opened up the possibility of expanded scope of practice of primary care registered nurses within an interprofessional team.

Presenters: Kim Cook, Vice President Community Health & Chief Professional Practice, Scarborough Centre for Healthy Communities; Ade Oyemade, Professional Practice Manager, Scarborough Centre for Healthy Communities

Theme: High performing interprofessional teams

Audience: Front line/clinical and/or program staff|Program management

C4: Culturally and Linguistically Tailored Health Promotion: Towards health equity for immigrant communities - Part I / Part II

CATIE, Access Alliance and Toronto Public Health, three organizations working closely with newcomers in three different settings will make a case for in-language health promotion to reduce health inequities for immigrant populations. Topics covered will include: the role of culturally and linguistically tailored chronic disease prevention and management in reducing health disparities; the successful experience of taking hepatitis C information to large immigrant communities living in Ontario in their own language through community-based education, outreach and media work; and anonymous counselling, information and referral resources offered over an infoline in 13 languages. The session will delve into identifying needs, development partnerships, and how to ensure accuracy in translation.

Presenters: Fozia Tanveer, Manager, Immigrant and Newcomer Hepatitis C Community Health Programming, CATIE, Canada's Source for HIV and Hepatitis C Education; Nicole Nitti, Medical Doctor, Access Alliance Multicultural Health and Community Services; Brian Chen, Supervisor AIDS and Sexual Health Info Line, Toronto Public Health

Theme: People and communities at the centre

Audience: Front line/clinical and/or program staff|Policy makers|Program management|Board members

C5: Learning Health Systems: How to harness data to improve the health of populations served

An interprofessional research team has submitted a proposal to build tools that will automate real-time analyses of data sets such as patient encounters and community/client characteristics. By applying “big data” computing, artificial intelligence, and human-centred design to build analytics and clinician-patient decision support tools, personalized care options for each patient will ultimately improve care and outcomes. The goal of this project is to build knowledge that facilitates a cycle of health improvement. This session will review the proposed project plan and deliverables, and explore the necessary factors to promote success in developing a Learning Health System.

Presenters: Jennifer Rayner, Director, Research and Evaluation, Association of Ontario Health Centres; Merrick Zwarenstein

Theme: High performing interprofessional teams

Audience: Front line/clinical and/or program staff|Program management

C6: Trauma Informed Care: Unpacking the “Triple ACE” approach

In this session, trauma informed care will be reviewed in detail. A new framework that encompasses understanding the impact of the “Triple ACEs” – Adverse Childhood Experiences, Adverse Community Environments, and Accurate Compassion and Empathy – will be outlined. The comprehensive framework aims to understand the impact of generational and historical trauma as well as ongoing adversities. The final “ACE” gives front line providers a framework of care that recognizes the need for boundaries for both the patient and provider to flourish, and the session will detail examples of daily applications in a range of health care settings.

Presenters: Rupa Patel, Physician, Kingston Community Health Centres

Theme: Mental health and harm reduction

Audience: Front line/clinical and/or program staff|Senior management|Policy makers

C7: Reframing Governance: Leading Practices from Ontario’s Health System

High performing boards are needed to support innovation and advance delivery of people and community-centred primary health care.  In our complex environment, governing boards are required to work in multiple modes – fiduciary, strategic and generative. In this session, I will profile how higher performing boards have adopted governance as leadership and share leading practices to promote a culture of inquiry to impact an organization’s mission.

Presenters: Gwen DuBois-Wing, PhD, Fellow, Institute for Social Innovation, Fielding Graduate University

Theme: Community-centred governance and equity

Audience: Senior management|Board members|Administration

C8: SPOTLIGHT SESSIONS

C8.1: Breaking Down Barriers to Accessing Quality Healthcare for the Amish/Mennonite Population in Elgin County

Thousands of people within Ontario experience barriers accessing healthcare within their own community. In Elgin County, the approximately 6,000 Amish and Low-German speaking Mennonites have been identified as a group experiencing barriers to primary care. During this session, Central Community Health Centre will share their experiences offering primary health care services to this under-serviced group by establishing trust within a historically difficult to reach population.

Presenters: Jackie Harris, Primary Care Manager, Central Community Health Centre; Heather Stillitano, Executive Assistant/QIP Lead, Central Community Health Centre

Theme: People and communities at the centre

Audience: All audiences

C8.2: Moving Health Equity Forward…..a Shared Journey to Get It “Right”

In 2016, leaders in primary care, public health and community services came together to discuss the viability of a cross sector action group on health equity, and out of that discussion, the Moving Health Equity Forward in Grey Bruce group was created. A broad engagement plan included senior leaders, front line providers and individuals with lived experience. The group’s first priority was to create a tool to support using a health equity lens in all our work. Cross-sector, cross-ministry engagement was used to draft the tool, finalize it, and support adoption. This session will explore the tool, its accompanying website, and lessons learned from the development process.

Presenters: Debbie Taylor, Health Link Project Manager, South Bruce Grey Health Centre; Tanya Shute, Manager of Allied Health Services/Quality & Risk Management, South East Grey Community Health Centre

Theme: People and communities at the centre

Audience: All audiences

C9: To Peer or Not to Peer? Harm reduction at work

Despite the apparent value of involving community members in health centre governance and service delivery, how often are our clients who use drugs meaningfully involved? This presentation will address questions related to oft-cited barriers to involving people who use drugs in program delivery. A panel of people with experience of illicit drug use, who are employed in harm reduction programming, will share experiences of their transition from client to co-worker. Panellists have all been clients of the Toronto Community Hep C Program (TCHCP), and the session will cover how the TCHCP meaningfully employs people who use drugs in treatment and support.

Presenters: Keith Williams, Community Support Worker, Toronto Community Hep C Program; Signe Dewar, Patient Advisory Board Member, Toronto Community Hep C Program

Theme: Mental health and harm reduction

Audience: Front line/clinical and/or program staff|Program management

C10: Can I trust you? Enhancing the trust paradigm between clients and providers

Privacy and security of information we collect, use, disclose, retain and dispose of presents a huge responsibility for organizations to protect the data we are entrusted with.  This presentation looks at data protection from a C level angle involving protecting privacy and the security of the data by implementing best practices to secure the data within health care organizations using various industry-recognized frameworks such as NIST, ISO, CIS Controls. The presentation will also touch on the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA) which promotes transparency and accountability within the health care sector.  This event will prepare organization’s to think about upcoming regulation changes within privacy laws and security compliance requirements in the near future.  

Presenters: Simeon Kanev, Privacy Business Analyst, Association of Ontario Health Centres; Safraz Iqbal, IT Infrastructure and Systems Analyst, Association of Ontario Health Centres; Ram Shankar, CIO, North Hamilton CHC

Theme: High performing interprofessional teams

Audience: Senior management|Policy makers|Program management|Board members|Administration

C11: From Change Fatigue to Energizing Change through an Administrative Redesign Initiative

Presenters from Rideau Community Health Services (RCHS) will highlight the success of the Administrative Redesign Initiative. This initiative began two years ago with an aim to maximize scarce administrative resources. RCHS will share their journey on how they engaged with dedicated, hardworking administrative staff, who had expressed signs of change fatigue, and found efficiencies, improved effectiveness and discovered so much more along the way – energizing change! The session will highlight what was used to drive change, enablers along the way, and a-ha moments – both from the presenters perspective and through participants’ engagement.

Presenters: Anne Caron, Director, Corporate and Administrative Services, Rideau Community Health Services; Terri Harrison, Vice President, Consulting Services & Sr. Strategist, Tap Strategy & HR Consulting

Theme: Demonstrating value and impact

Audience: All audiences

C12: Transformation Governance: Best Practices for Boards Engaged in Health System Renewal

The health and social service sector has been undergoing significant systems level restructuring with a greater focus on integration of the care continuum to advance patient-centered care. This session will cover: a review of health system transformation legislation and legal obligations; roles and responsibilities of health centre board of directors members; best practices for generative governance, community-centered governance, and risk governance; and practical strategies and lessons learned from implementation of integration initiatives across Ontario.

Presenters: Karima Kanani, Partner, Miller Thomson LLP

Theme: Community-centred governance and equity

Audience: Senior management|Board members

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D STREAM

D1: Visioning for Change - Health Equity and Self Aspiration

We often see that the community members we serve are no longer dreaming because of the stress associated with daily living: learning an official language; looking for a job; taking care of family obligations - the list goes on. This interactive session, offered in English and French, will provide an opportunity to focus on hopes, dreams and aspirations through the creation of ‘vision boards.’ This session is a creative outlet for participants to self-reflect, invest in personal growth and wellbeing, and create social connections.

Presenters: Valerie Assoi, Community Engagement Worker, South East Ottawa Community Health Centre; Lynda Giffen, Community and Health Equity Developer, Sandy Hill Community Health Centre

Theme: People and communities at the centre

Audience: All audiences

D2: How Can We Measure Progress on Health Equity? Lessons from the co-creation of a framework planning and measurement tool

The vast majority of Community Health Centres do health equity work, but how do we know if we are making progress? This session will introduce the concept behind the Health Equity Framework. The framework is adapted from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement White Paper Achieving Health Equity: A Guide for Health Care Organizations (Cambridge, Mass., 2016), and is designed to help organizations build capacity for health equity work while strengthening organizational and staff commitment. Partner CHCs will provide their unique perspectives on practical applications of the framework. This will be followed by a hands-on collaborative learning activity.

Presenters: Axelle Janczur, Executive Director; Heidi Schaeffer, Knowledge Management and Learning Lead; Miranda Saroli, Project Coordinator

Theme: Health equity and anti-oppression

Audience: All audiences

D3: Consumer Health: Fad, or the natural evolution of health care?

Dr. Carole Orchard and Kateryna Metersky’s research in interprofessional client-centered collaborative practice shows full inclusion of clients in their team-based care has potential to improved health outcomes. Re-thinking client’s role in their care requires a significant shift in health providers view of their role. This session will explore perceived client’s role within health care and its effect on both clients and providers. Then a strategy using the AOHC’s Consumer Health ‘e’ Strategy will focus on client’s role through their personal health records. Finally, a discussion about actions to transform understanding about the public’s role in their health care will occur.

Presenters: Rodney Burns, CIO, Association of Ontario Health Centres; Marc Gordon, IMS Program Lead, Association of Ontario Health Centres; Dr. Carole Orchard, Professor, Western University; Kateryna Metersky, Doctoral Candidate, PhD Nursing Program, Western University

Theme: People and communities at the centre

D4: DOUBLE SESSION

D4.1: Breastfeeding Support: Highlighting Leading Practice Initiatives That Work With the Community

People and Communities at the Centre: highlighting the contribution and impact of families who take centre stage in the development and delivery of our multi-faceted breastfeeding supports services in primarily low income, socially isolated, newcomer communities in Toronto. Our established system for delivering effective and accessible breastfeeding support is community-centred and based in the partnership model. We will present our accomplished, multi-service system model, which employs community engagement practices to deliver effective education programs that reduce social isolation and systemic service barriers, and improve duration in populations with lower rates of breastfeeding.

Presenters: Clare Ambraska, Community Health Worker, Flemingdon Health Centre; Catherine McEvilly Pestl, Lactation Consultant, Flemingdon Health Centre

Theme: Demonstrating value and impact

Audience: All audiences

D4.2: Informed decision making - Learning how to have meaningful infant-feeding conversations

This interactive workshop identifies and demonstrates tools for health care provides when sharing evidence-based information with families regarding their infant feeding decision. Learn how to incorporate key elements of mother-centred conversations in order to provide best practice information in a sensitive and unbiased manner while working through a video scenario.

Presenters: Catharine Lowes, Health Promotion Specialist, BFI Strategy for Ontario; Doris Balcarras, Health Promotion Specialist, BFI Strategy for Ontario

Theme: High performing interprofessional teams

Audience: Front line/clinical and/or program staff|Senior management|Policy makers|Program management

D5: SPOTLIGHT SESSIONS 

D5.1: Providing 2SLGBT Specific Care Within Northern/Rural Ontario

This session will focus on the struggles and discrepancies in providing 2SLGBT specific care within northern/rural Ontario. It will include a focus on the individualized care trends within the 2SLGBT communities from a medical view point with special attention to working with the two spirit within an Aboriginal Health Access Centre. Additionally, we'll discuss organizational change, policy, ensuring safe and competent workplaces/ environments and overall access of care and health equity.

Presenter: Michael Barnett NP-PHC, BScN, MScN, Nurse Practitioner, Shkagamik-Kwe Health Centre

Theme: High performing interprofessional teams

D5.2: Ottawa Senior Pride Network: Creative partnerships for a vibrant community initiative
LGBTQ people experience disparities in health outcomes and health inequities increase with age. This session will focus on a partnership between Centretown Community Health Centre and the Ottawa Senior Pride Network to reduce disparities and foster wellbeing. The approach is multi-faceted: building community, advocating for system and policy change, reducing social isolation, and providing services. Learn about several best practices developed and discuss how these might be adapted and applied to your communities.

Presenters: Barry Deeprose, Ottawa Senior Pride Network; Janis Dahl, Health Promoter, Centretown Community Health Centre

Theme: Health equity and anti-oppression

D5.3: Mental Health Services and LGBTQ2S Youth in Toronto

In 2016 the LGBTQ Youth Initiative conducted a needs assessment and found that LGBTQ2S youth were consistently saying “When we’re with people who don’t support us, we feel horrible, but when we’re together, we’re better people and we’re here for each other.” This session will explore how the results of this program have resulted in responsive programming for youth mental health. The session will also explore how mental health programming for LGBTQ2S youth is offered within a CHC.

Presenters: Anna Penner, Coordinator, Research and Programming, Planned Parenthood Toronto; Katarina Maatta-Hebdon MSW, RSW, Therapist, Planned Parenthood Toronto

Theme: High performing interprofessional teams

Audiences: All audiences

D6: Surviving overdose, healing communities: comprehensive tools and advocacy for overdose response and prevention

The overdose crisis continues to have a devastating impact on individuals and communities. This workshop will explore some of the recent responses and actions of staff and clients of South Riverdale Community Health Centre’s COUNTERfit Harm Reduction team to both prevent and heal from overdose loss.  Examples will include the Overdose Prevention Site in Moss Park, Toronto, as well as the use of Healing Circles.  Lessons learned and impacts will be shared, as well as a discussion of the role of CHCs in this crisis and where we need to go from here.

Presenters: Les Harper, South Riverdale Community Health Centre; Rhiannon Thomas, South Riverdale Community Health Centre; Zoe Dodd, South Riverdale Community Health Centre; Yvette Perreault, AIDS Bereavement & Resiliency Program of Ontario

Theme: Mental health and harm reduction

Audience: All audiences

D7: Organizational Commitment to Indigenous Cultural Safety for Senior Leaders in Health Settings

In this session, we’ll explore aspects of an Indigenous Cultural Safety organizational system framework for creating health service settings free of anti-Indigenous racial discrimination. Organizational learning and related wise/emerging practices for cultural safety training will be shared. In addition, the session will include an interactive activity to deepen understanding of how biases and stereotyping about Indigenous people shape services at all levels.

Presenters: Diane Smylie, Director, Ontario Indigenous Cultural Safety Program; Michèle Parent-Bergeron, Provincial Practice Lead, Ontario Indigenous Cultural Safety Program; Leila Monib, Provincial Practice Lead, Ontario Indigenous Cultural Safety Program; Randy Ray, Provincial Practice Lead, Ontario Indigenous Cultural Safety Program

Theme: Truth and Reconciliation

Audience: Senior Management

D8: Transactional vs. Transformational: Leading with a Racial Equity Lens for Structural Change

Through a presentation and discussion, participants will strengthen their knowledge of strategies and tools to achieve community-centred governance and racial equity within their organizations. We will explore a framework for creating equitable boards that moves beyond diversity and inclusion to promoting equitable decision-making. We will discuss how leading with an anti-oppression lens is an essential component of an organizational strategy for systemic transformation. This session will equip board members and leaders with skills and tools to examine the state of diversity, equity and inclusion in their organizations, and help them identify gaps in policies, programs, and practices.

Presenters: TAIBU Community Health Centre

Theme: Community-centred governance and equity

Audience: Senior management|Policy makers|Board members

D9: DOUBLE SESSION

D9.1: An Interprofessional Approach to Chronic Disease Self-Management Among Immigrants and Refugees: Building Evidence and Organizational Best Practices

In this session, we use a systematic approach to recommend evidence-based, tailored changes at the institutional level to support chronic disease self-management within a primary care setting. Racialized clients, particularly those who are newcomers (less than 10 years in Canada) at Access Alliance Multicultural Health and Community Services experience significant barriers that limit their ability to self-manage chronic diseases, leading to worsening health outcomes. By synthesizing the results from a systematic literature review and semi-structured interviews with service providers at Access Alliance, we will share recommendations for self-management support that can serve as a model for other primary care centres.

Presenters: Rosalinda Chen, MD Candidate, University of Toronto; Nicole Nitti, Medical Director and Family Physician, Access Alliance Multicultural Health and Community Services

Theme: High performing interprofessional teams

Audience: All audiences

D9.2: Engaging interprofessional primary care teams in quality improvement projects to improve cancer screening rates and access to primary care

A nurse practitioner and registered nurse from Access Alliance Multicultural Health and Community Services will share evidence based stories from their experiences chairing quality improvement (QI) projects. Their projects aim to improve cancer screening rates and access to care for the centre’s immigrant and refugee client population. This workshop will explore the stages of QI process and the learning journey undertaken by front line service providers at Access Alliance. Participants can expect to learn about tools, resources, potential challenges and tips that would be helpful for any community-based health agencies interested in implementing QI projects in their own team settings.

Presenters: Monika Dalmacio, Registered Nurse / Health Coach, Access Alliance Multicultural Health and Community Services; Amanda McIntyre, Nurse Practitioner, Primary Health Care, Access Alliance Multicultural Health and Community Services

Theme: Demonstrating value and impact

Audience: Front line/clinical and/or program staff|Senior management

D10: DOUBLE SESSION

D10.1: Building a Seamless System: Enabling shared care planning between Primary Care and Community Support Services

A key focus of the Rural Hastings Health Link (RHHL) is to mobilize coordinated care. Pathways for coordinating care and technology that enables information flow between health system and community support partners are essential. This session explores the Care Coordination Protocol established between the RHHL System Navigator (SN) and the Regional Care Coordinator (RCC) program, used when Community Support Services (CSS) are required for individuals aged 60 and over. The session will also cover the development of a secure web-based portal (there will be a demo), and the integrated care pathways that decrease duplication and enhance patients’ experience of seamless care.

Presenters: Julia Swedak, Director of Quality and Knowledge Management, Gateway CHC; Val Myles Gill, Manager Regional Care Programs, Community Care for Central Hastings

Theme: Transforming our health system

Audience: All audiences

D10.2: Designing a Better Experience for Patients and Providers with Patients and Providers: How to Implement Experience Based Design

The Experience Based Design model brings together patients and providers to co-design services in partnership. Learn how early adopter Health Links (Rural Hastings Health Link and Kingston Health Link) piloted this model to capture perspectives and feedback from primary care providers to identify successes, commonalities, barriers and challenges of the Health Link model. Participants will learn approaches and techniques used in the implementation of the model and have opportunity to discuss how they may apply Experience Based Design in their own practice.

Presenters: Laura Cassidy, Quality Improvement Decision Support Specialist, Maple FHT; Alicia McCullam, Rural Hastings Health Link Project Manager; Linda Robb Blenderman, RN, BScN, MSc, Kingston Health Link Project Manager/Coordinator 

Theme: Transforming our health system

Audience: All audiences

D11: SPOTLIGHT SESSIONS

D11.1: Design Thinking: A model for implementing innovative change ideas and strategies at Community Health Centres

Community Health Centres are always looking to improve access to and the quality of programs, both to meet the funders’ requirements and reduce costs. So, how can they deal with these priorities while controlling costs? How can they do more with less without compromising quality of care? This session will introduce participants to design thinking and its significant impact on the regional programs hosted at various Community Health Centres. Workshop participants will learn the step-by-step process of how to implement change ideas and strategies over time, with a focus on team culture and strategy renewal.

Presenters: Clément Habiyakare, Director of Planning and Community Engagement, French Language Health Services Network of Eastern Ontario

Theme: Transforming our health system

Audience: Front line/clinical and/or program staff|Senior management|Program management

D11.2: Co-designing quality improvement: theory to practice

This leading practice spotlight will introduce co-design within the framework of equity-oriented quality improvement. Through an overview of methods and theories associated with collaborative human-centred design, participants will gain an understanding of its relative advantages, as well as potential effects on equity and anti-oppression in applied health services contexts. Topics covered will include: theory and ethics of co-design, distinctness from related approaches, co-design and equity, design and mixed methods research, iterative implementation, and measurement.

Presenters: Joseph Donia, Founder, Huddle

Theme: People and communities at the centre

Audience: Front line/clinical and/or program staff|Senior management|Program management|Administration

D11.3: A Descriptive Case Study that Exemplifies the Model of Health and Wellbeing

As comprehensive, equitable primary health centre organizations become increasingly recognized as critical parts of the health system, it is important to capture their approach and the Community Health Centre values that drive their care on the front lines. The case study research conducted exemplifies the operationalization of the Model of Health and Wellbeing. This model, adopted by the 107 CHCs in Ontario, provides a comprehensive description of an ideal delivery model with concrete examples.

Presenters: Rebecca Lyon, Practicum Student, Association of Ontario Health Centres; Jennifer Rayner, Director, Research and Evaluation, Association of Ontario Health Centres

Theme: Demonstrating value and impact

Audience: All audiences

D12: Vers une stratégie provinciale communautaire afin d’étendre l’accès aux services en français pour les Franco-Ontariens et les Franco-Ontariennes

Participez à une discussion novatrice au sujet de l’amélioration des services de santé en français (SEF) si vous faites partie d’un organisme francophone, bilingue ou anglophone avec un intérêt à ce sujet. La session est également ouverte aux divers membres des Conseils d’administration. Le but du dialogue sera de faire le lien entre la transformation actuelle du système de santé provincial et les opportunités que le secteur communautaire souhaite maximiser.

D13: Rx: Community II – Lessons in Social Prescribing from the UK’s National Health Service

This session accompanies our Social Prescribing plenary and serves as part of the official launch for Rx: Community, our new Social Prescribing Pilot project. Come ask UK leaders how they do it! In this session we will have a Q&A on how to use health-promoting link workers to strengthen the connections between primary health care and the community and voluntary sectors.

Presenters: Tim Anfilogoff, Head of Community Resilience, Herts Valleys Clinical Commissioning Group (HVCCG); Dr. Marie Anne Essam, Clinical Lead for Social Prescribing at HVCCG; Alyson McGregor, National Director, Altogether Better

Theme: People and Communities at the Centre

Audience: All audiences

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